Abbey Smith

Abbey Smith

Pick up any publication pertaining to the sport of rock climbing, and chances are, you will see a smattering of descriptive chronicles highlighting the travels and adventures of the prolific scribe Abbey Smith. A climber and writer for over 10 years, Abbey travels extensively, financing her jet set lifestyle though her writing, allowing her more opportunities to pursue her love of adventure. Abbey has reported on a myriad of topics. From the exclusive hobby of vintage motor racing, to sassy, healthy-savvy posts on BeThree.com, to being on the editorial staff of the independent green publication elephant journal, a quarterly magazine devoted to living the "mindful life" through conscious consumerism, sustainability, eco-fashion and non new-aged spirituality.

Abbey's energy for writing is ravenous. When she speaks of it, her article ideas roll out of mouth in constant barrage without commas, periods, or other punctuation, but when placed in front of a computer, the word stream subsides into descriptive prose reminiscent of Joanne Harris. Dead Point Magazine is privileged to have her as a contributing blogger.

 

BLOG ENTRIES

I admit that I often cannot distinguish fantasy from reality...
“I opened my eyes And looked up at the rain, And it dripped in my head And flowed into my brain,
In the days leading up to my 28th birthday on March 18, I started to feel deadened by the monotony of my daily 10-hour work routine...
Time seems to get absorbed by the remote desert expanses of Hueco Tanks. My 10-day road trip managed to stretch on four weeks unexpectedly.
“Alright, let’s go get scared!” Corbitt hollered as he jumped out of the car in Hueco’s Campground Overflow parking lot.
Everything was dark and silent. Glittering snowflakes gently gathered around me. My body convulsed against the freezing cold air. The skin on my face tightened and my eyes burned dry.
Standing on stage reminded me of Jonny’s absolute dedication to his loved ones, adventures in the unexplored mountains, and his artistic craft of photography, writing and film.
The hardest part about traveling is coming home. Nine hour long bus rides along India’s rotting roads, horns honking incessantly, diesel and dung filled air, sleeping in a tent for 40 days ...
The time has come for the Zanskar Odyssey to begin. As I write this, there are exactly 24 hours before Jason Kehl, Pete Takeda, Mick Follari and I board the plane bound for Delhi, India.
I have forgotten the feeling of boredom. Preparing to disconnect from the modern world for two months is more complex and laborious than I expected.